Mango Languages for K-12 Students

Oct 26, 2010 7:38:11 AM / by Rachel Reardon

Mango has been hard at work putting the finishing touches on our Educator Edition that is currently being made available to our K-12 customers and higher educational facilities. This new edition has some very exciting functionality designed specifically with students and teachers in mind. One cool feature is the ability to track students’ usage as they progress through the Mango lessons.

Teachers can segment their student population into virtual classrooms, making it extremely easy to track different groups of students. They can name their virtual classrooms any name they wish and view small portions of students with whom they are actively involved. Once inside the virtual classroom, each student has their own set of statistics to view including which language they are using, which lessons they have attempted, and how long they have spent on each lesson. Teachers now have the ability to assign Mango as homework with our unlimited remote access feature, and they can actually see which students are completing the selected lessons!

This is just one of the features that makes our Educator Edition such an effective tool to help teachers share their love of language learning with their students. Teacher feedback was critical to the design of this unique interface, and it their suggestions have also put Mango to work on our assessment feature and custom lessons. Think of all the tools you have available in your school for language learning: can you think of other features that we could include to make it even better? What kinds of features do you wish you had had as a student when you were learning a foreign language in your school?

Topics: Higher Ed, Language Learning and Culture, Mango News

Rachel Reardon

Written by Rachel Reardon

Rachel works with some of the coolest marketers, designers, and writers around to help Mango look and sound its best. She loves bold colors, old books, the Montréal metro, and Star Trek. She has conflicting feelings about the Oxford comma.

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