Kimberly Cortes


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Let me repeat myself...

By Kimberly Cortes |   Apr 15, 2010 4:37:33 AM

In my most recent blogs I have been looking at different hypotheses pertaining to second language learning (SLL), specifically Krashen’s Input Hypothesis ( i + 1: Is this algebra class?), and Swain’s Output Hypothesis (If you don’t use it…You will lose it). This week I would like to turn our attention to a hypothesis that involves both the input and output of the second language, the Interaction hypothesis. Don’t worry there’s no algebra involved!

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If You Don't Use It...You Will Lose It

By Kimberly Cortes |   Mar 25, 2010 4:57:38 AM

My previous blog post discussed Krashen’s Input Hypothesis. Of course input is necessary for a learner to acquire a new language. However, studies have shown that language learners (LLs) can often achieve high levels of comprehension in the second language (L2) without ever achieving a moderate level of production (Swain 1985, 1995).

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Krashen’s Input Hypothesis and Comprehensible Input: [i +1]

By Kimberly Cortes |   Feb 25, 2010 4:43:45 AM

All theorists of language-learning agree that second language input of some form is necessary for learning a new language. It is also necessary to be able to understand and process the input for second language acquisition to take place. This is because second language acquisition (SLA) occurs on a development continuum.

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Ghoti Spells Fish

By Kimberly Cortes |   Feb 11, 2010 6:30:47 AM

How many of you remember your parents or siblings drilling you for the upcoming spelling bee when you were in grade school? R-E-A-D spells "read." I like to read. But wait, R-E-A-D also spells "read," as in, "I read a good book yesterday." English is a funny language when it comes to spelling and the correspondence between letters and sounds. This is partially because the English language has held on to much of its Old English orthography. This is a benefit when reading somewhat old historical texts. But, it’s not so great when it comes to teaching spelling, reading, and writing. I’m sure many ESL and elementary school students would agree. Indeed many native adult English speakers, including yours truly, still struggle with spelling. Isn’t that why they invented spell check?

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Mighty Morphemes

By Kimberly Cortes |   Jan 21, 2010 4:10:06 AM

Morphology is the study of the structure of words. Words can be broken into morphemes. Morphemes are the smallest unit of meaning.

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The Linguistic Elephant in the Room

By Kimberly Cortes |   Jan 7, 2010 3:45:57 AM

There is a famous parable of six blind men and an elephant that originated from India. In one version of the story the six blind men were brought together and asked to determine what an elephant looked like by feeling different parts of the elephant’s body. The blind man who feels a leg says the elephant is like a pillar; the one who feels the tail says the elephant is like a rope; the one who feels the trunk says the elephant is like a snake; the one who feels the ear says the elephant is like a fan; the one who feels the belly says the elephant is like a wall; and the one who feels the tusk says the elephant is like a spear.

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